Jesus, the child of Virgin Mary

No one killed Mark Hay and the families of Aarti Prasad are still living peacefully without prosecution. No one thinks this as religious assault. Like this article, can other religions not have an open mind and scientific inquiry about religious dogmas?

(Excerpts from an article from Mary Kay)

Stunning and iconoclastic read from Mark Hay. No one killed Mark Hay and the families of Aarti Prasad are still living peacefully without prosecution. No one thinks this as religious assault. Like this article, can other religions not have an open mind and scientific inquiry about religious dogmas? Excerpts below, read full text by clicking the link below the excerpts.

Although the religious meaning of Christmas was long ago neutered, replaced with the secular joys of eggnog and mall Santas, at its core December 25 is still a celebration of Jesus Christ’s virgin birth. With that assumption, the go-to scientific explanation for the virgin birth has long been that Mary somehow achieved human parthenogenesis, a process by which some animals reproduce without mates.

Parthenogenesis is also surprisingly common in healthy populations living in the wild. And while researchers are still trying to figure out what triggers parthenogenesis, the fact that it happens across so many species means it’s theoretically possible that Mary could have given parthenogenetic birth to Christ.

In 2004, Japanese researchers showed that they could alter imprinting genes in mouse eggs to create an artificial but fully parthenogenetic and viable baby. In her 2012 book Like A Virgin,science writer Aarathi Prasad offers a couple workarounds. One possibility, Prasad theorizes, is that Mary could have been a genetic chimera—meaning, formed from both male and female embryos—which would have meant she had Y chromosomal material that could have been absorbed into her theoretically self-created Christ child. Alternatively, Prasad offers, Mary could have been intersex—having both female and male genetic characteristics. Specifically, she could have been born with ovotestes, a condition in which a woman gets an X chromosome from her father that contains a sprinkle of Y chromosome, leading to the development of a hybrid ovary-testes organ. If Mary only manifested her male material in her gonads and, again, had a perfect balance of masculine and feminine tissues and hormones, her ovotestes could have produced sperm and eggs simultaneously, sending them down the fallopian tubes together, and resulting in fertilization and implantation within her functional uterus.

Sorry, wasn’t able to add hyperlink. Google “The Science Behind the Virgin Birth” by Mark Hay.

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